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Women's Engineering Academy

 

 

The Women's Engineering Academy hosts 9th-12th grade young women at our Edgewood campus.  Women's Engineering is an afternoon academy.

 

Interested in learning more about the Women's Engineering Academy?  Check out our photo gallery.

 

Introduction to Engineering Design - Civil Engineering & Architecture PLTW  

9th Grade Scholars from Simon Kenton, Dixie Heights, & Scott High Schools

 

The courses in the Project Lead the Way sequence of engineering studies is offered to freshman females who have completed Algebra One or Geometry.  The courses teaches problem-solving skills by engaging scholars in the engineering process.  Models of product solutions are created, analyzed, and communicated in a variety of ways including the use of solid modeling computer design software.  Scholars learn about various aspects of civil engineering and architecture and apply their knowledge to the design and development of residential and commercial properties and structures. In addition, scholars use 3D design software to design and document solutions for major course projects. Scholars communicate and present solutions to their peers and members of a professional community of engineers and architects. This course is offered only in the Kenton County Academies of Innovation and Technology.  Scholars must also enroll in a mathematics course & English course in the Academy (see below).

 

Freshman Pathway: 
Introduction to Engineering Design/Civil Engineering & Architecture           
Accelerated English I           
Accelerated Algebra II*

*Scholars enrolling in the freshman pathway for the Academy must also take GEOMETRY at their home high school if they have not already completed it.

 

 

Principles of Engineering - Computer Integrated Manufacturing PLTW

10th Grade Scholars from Simon Kenton, Dixie Heights, & Scott High Schools

 

The courses in the Project Lead the Way sequence of engineering studies is offered to sophomore females who have completed Geometry and Algebra Two.  The courses helps scholars understand various fields of engineering/engineering technology.  Exploring various technology systems and manufacturing processes help scholars learn how engineers and technicians use math, science, and technology in an engineering problem solving process to benefit people.  The courses also includes concerns about social and political consequences of technological change.  The question? How are things made? What processes go into creating products? Is the process for making a water bottle the same as it is for a musical instrument? How do assembly lines work? How has automation changed the face of manufacturing? While scholars discover the answers to these questions, they’re learning about the history of manufacturing, robotics and automation, manufacturing processes, computer modeling, manufacturing equipment, and flexible manufacturing systems. Scholars must also enroll in a mathematics course and English course in the academy (see below)

 

Sophomore Pathway:   
Principles of Engineering - Computer Integrated Manufacturing       
Accelerated English II          
Accelerated/Honors  Pre-Calculus**

**Scholars enrolling in the sophomore pathway for the Academy must have completed Geometry and Algebra II.

 

Digital Electronics - Aerospace Engineering PLTW

11th Grade Scholars from Simon Kenton, Dixie Heights, & Scott High Schools

The courses in the Project Lead the Way sequence of engineering studies is offered to junior females who have completed Pre-Calculus.  From smart phones to appliances, digital circuits are all around us. The DE course provides a foundation for scholars who are interested in electrical engineering, electronics, or circuit design. Scholars study topics such as combinational and sequential logic and are exposed to circuit design tools used in industry, including: logic gates, integrated circuits, and programmable logic devices.  The ASE course propels scholars’ learning in the fundamentals of atmospheric and space flight. As they explore the physics of flight, scholars bring the concepts to life by designing an airfoil, propulsion system, and rockets. They learn basic orbital mechanics using industry-standard software. They also explore robot systems through projects such as remotely operated vehicles.  Scholars must also enroll in a mathematics course and English course in the academy (see below)

 

Junior Pathway:        
Digital Electronics - Aerospace Engineering                       
AP Language                        
AP Calculus

 

 

Engineering Design & Development/Academic Internship PLTW

12th Grade Scholars from Simon Kenton, Dixie Heights, & Scott High Schools

The knowledge and skills scholars acquire throughout PLTW Engineering come together in EDD as they identify an issue and then research, design, and test a solution, ultimately presenting their solution to a panel of engineers. Scholars apply the professional skills they have developed to document a design process to standards, completing EDD ready to take on any post-secondary program or career. The EDD is paired with the Academic Internship. An Academic Internship is a type of “Work-Based Learning Experience Program” for high school scholars (mainly seniors) who have completed extensive school-based preparation relating to an identified area of engineering and other academic interest.  To participate in an Academic Internship a scholar must apply. The internship can vary in length, will be non-paid (mentor could set aside money for dual credit opportunities for the scholar) and lead to course credit if all criteria are met.  The Academic Internship will take place at the training site of the mentor and will be a component of a scholar’s schedule either during the regular school day, after school hours, or during the summer, and may be one semester, one or more trimesters, or a year long experience.

 

Senior Pathway:         
Engineering Design & Development - Academic Internship                       
AP Statistics